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Fletcher St Barracks

Updated December 21, 2016 9:04 PM

Photo from my album

1902 July 18th
In the early hours of Sunday morning, the members of the Third Bolton Volunteer Active Service Company returned home from the front in South Africa after an absence of several months. Great disappointment was caused amongst their relatives and friends owing to the men not reaching Bolton at the hour expected. They were expected just after eight o'clock, and by that time thousands of people lined the route from the Station to Fletcher St Barracks. It was then announced that the men would arrive at ten o'clock, with the result that the crowd dispersed and re-assembled at the time named. At this time another disappointment was in store, with a statement that they would not arrive until midnight. They eventually reached Bolton at 1.15am, were greeted at the Station by the Mayor and other officials. The public by this time were not present in any great numbers.

1902 September 20th
The remains of the late Capt. S. G. Miller, Quarter Master of the Bolton Battalion, North Lancashire Regiment, were laid to rest with military honours in the Church of England portion of Heaton Cemetery this afternoon. Deceased died at Southport, and the corpse, which arrived at Trinity St. Station by the 11.45 train this morning, was conveyed in the hearse to Fletcher St Barracks. At 2.25 this afternoon, the Battalion paraded at headquarters. The first procedure was the formation of an escort, twenty-two men acting as a firing party. As the body was brought out, the party presented arms. The firing party then reversed arms and marched out into Fletcher St., followed by the band, after which came the coffin of polished oak, wrapped in the Union Jack, with deceased's sword and helmet, and a beautiful wreath from his widow upon it, and mounted upon a gun carriage.
All along the route to the cemetery numerous blinds were down, and crowds of sympathetic spectators gathered to witness the last sad rites. At the conclusion of the funeral service, the firing party fired three volleys.

Where the old Barracks stands was formerly the Bolton Union Workhouse which was built in 1812.

Prior to 1812 the Old Hall Poorhouse was used and was on the site now occupied by the Town Hall.

In 1820 the Poorhouse was granted a licence as the Three Arrows Inn and demolished in 1865 for the building of the Town Hall

The Workhouse on Fletcher St moved to a new site which was built on Fishpool Farm and called simply Fishpool, it's corner stones were laid on the 8th Sept 1856, Fishpool cost £2,880 and was completed in 1858.
It was built on land known as Fishpool Farm which was owned by the Church.

Opposite the Workhouse was the Great Bolton Reservoir No1 belonging to Bolton Free Water Works.

Ex St Marks School/Church

David Nigel Bull, John Victor Bull, Linda Rose Murphy, Phillip Murphy, Anne Norris,

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