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Tonge Moor Rd

Updated December 22, 2016 2:06 PM

Ex St Marks School/Church

Frederick Aughton,

In 1818 an Act was passed for "Inclosing lands in Tonge" Known as Tonge Moor.
Le Gendre Starkie was then lord of the manor of Tonge, an he and others, including the lords of the manors of Great and Little Bolton, who claimed "to be entitled to Right of Common and other Rights and Interests in and upon" the moor, had the rights divided amongst them after the Commissioners had set out the necessary public highways, etc.
The road over the moor to Bradshaw was then but a field path. It was taken over by the Edenfield and Little Bolton Trust, which body developed it out of the proceeds of toll bars.
When the Trust was abolished about the year 1878 and the toll bars removed there were only a few isolated groups of houses along it.
The neighbourhood of the Starkie was then known as Tonge Moor Gate, and the Starkie Arms Hotel was then called the Bowling Green Inn. On it's site formerly stood a tithebarn built in 1642 by Lawrence Brownlow, of Hall-i-th-wood.
A stone from it bearing the initials and date is built into the front of the present hotel building.
Castle Hill was an early group, and so was Moorfield House, on the site of which now a housing estate and new public library. Scope Hole Lane is no longer but it had very old buildings.
The rise from Turner Bridge was then known as Hey Brow.
Until the extension of the borough in 1898 the Bolton boundary was at the Folds and Tonge Moor rd then first got it's name.
Behind the once Conservative club at the Starkie was an old building with a circular headed window. that was part of a garage it once was the St Augustine's School building
The tonge Moor Methodist Church was opened in 1887, and one at Castle Hill in 1901.
More than half the houses built in Bolton between 1918 and 1934 were built in and about Tonge Moor district.
A large housing estate encroaches on the former domain of Hall-i-th-Wood but the old Hall still remains one of the most interesting monuments in the town. The name Tonge probably comes from the old english "tunge" meaning in this instance, a tongue shaped piece of land between the Eagley and Bradshaw brooks.

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